In 1934 the MPAA voluntarily passed the Motion Picture Production Code, more generally known as the Hays Code, largely to avoid governmental regulation. The code prohibited certain plotlines and imagery from films and in publicity materials produced by the MPAA. Among others, there was to be no cleavage, no lace underthings, no drugs or drinking, no corpses, and no one shown getting away with a crime.
A.L. Schafer, the head of photography at Columbia, took a photo that intentionally incorporated all of the 10 banned items into one image.
The photograph was clandestinely passed around among photographers and publicists in Hollywood as a method of symbolic protest to the Hays Code.

In 1934 the MPAA voluntarily passed the Motion Picture Production Code, more generally known as the Hays Code, largely to avoid governmental regulation. The code prohibited certain plotlines and imagery from films and in publicity materials produced by the MPAA. Among others, there was to be no cleavage, no lace underthings, no drugs or drinking, no corpses, and no one shown getting away with a crime.

A.L. Schafer, the head of photography at Columbia, took a photo that intentionally incorporated all of the 10 banned items into one image.

The photograph was clandestinely passed around among photographers and publicists in Hollywood as a method of symbolic protest to the Hays Code.

(Source: jillcorral.com, via vintage-chicana)

(Source: x-fxded, via infinite-paradox)

20th-century-man:

Lillian Miles / Reefer Madness (1938)
My grandmother…

20th-century-man:

Lillian Miles / Reefer Madness (1938)

My grandmother…

(via vintage-chicana)

littlehorrorshop:

Clara Bow poses in Wings, 1927

littlehorrorshop:

Clara Bow poses in Wings, 1927

(via uppertidelands)

historicaltimes:

Charles Ebbets shooting his famous photograph, “Lunch atop a Skyscraper”, while perching on the 69th floor of the GE building. 1932

historicaltimes:

Charles Ebbets shooting his famous photograph, “Lunch atop a Skyscraper”, while perching on the 69th floor of the GE building. 1932

(via k4tfish)


March 1943. New York, New York. Times Square on a rainy day.

March 1943. New York, New York. Times Square on a rainy day.

(Source: librar-y, via my1930s)

edwardianpromenade:

— Tillie Anderson (1890s), a champion cyclist. She inspired a generation of women when she raced during the 1890s and 1900s.

edwardianpromenade:

— Tillie Anderson (1890s), a champion cyclist. She inspired a generation of women when she raced during the 1890s and 1900s.

(via vanias-vintage-monstrosity)

cyclist-in-the-fog:

gosh….

psychodoughboys:

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

-Never too creepy to share riot tips. 

Good to know

(via picsbyjackal)

ourblackproject:

Following the Civil War, black Americans, through employment as musicians playing European music in military bands, developed new musical styles such as ragtime and what would become known as jazz. In developing this latter musical form, African Americans contributed knowledge of the sophisticated polyrhythmic structure of the dance and folk music of peoples across western and sub-Saharan Africa. Together, these musical forms had a wide-ranging and profound influence over the development of music within the United States and around the world during the 20th century.

Remembering the influence of black artists in American music.

(via vavavoomrevisited)